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Why second marriages are more likely to end in divorce

Studies show that second marriages are even more likely to end in divorce than first marriages. While some of the reasons may seem a bit obvious, other reasons for this may surprise you. Many people could see that the initial "fear factor" of actually taking the step to a divorce is less intimidating once it has been done already. If a spouse has experienced divorce before, the spouse already knows what it takes and how refreshing it can be to get out of an unhealthy relationship, even if it means ending another marriage.

In many instances, the relationship that leads to the second marriage begins before the original marriage has ended. This may lead to trust issues down the line. If one spouse has already been unfaithful, there may be a lingering doubt in the new marriage.

Since second marriages often take place later in life and later in each spouse's career, there may be less of a financial interdependence which may have kept other marriages together, albeit for the wrong reasons. In addition to financial reasons, second marriages later in life are less likely to have children from the marriage which is another factor that often keeps unhappily married couples together.

After a first marriage has failed, expectations amongst family and friends may be lower, and the stress and disappointment that often accompanies a divorce may not be as evident in subsequent divorces. With all this in mind, it is important for anyone in Minnesota considering divorce to take a step back and try to look at the relationship and the marriage from an outside perspective. Although a divorce may never seem to be ideal, as those who have had divorces before know, if the relationship is irreparable, a divorce will ultimately be best for all parties involved.

Source: Huffington Post, "Second Marriages Are More Likely To End In Divorce. Here's Why," accessed on March 14, 2017

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